One of the best things about Netflix is its incredible array of different types of movies. You can be in the mood for an action, a comedy, or a documentary, and Netflix is sure to have something for you. Netflix's huge catalog even includes foreign films, and it's those that we're focusing on today.

Netflix's foreign film collection is huge and intimidating, so we're helping out by narrowing the list down to these ten standout films. If you're diving into Netflix's foreign film options for the first time, start with these!

The Act of Killing: Theatrical Cut (2012)

The Act of Killing

This immensely disturbing documentary was produced by Werner Herzog (who also made Grizzly Man). The filmmakers asked former Indonesian death squad members to re-enact their crimes. The Act of Killing is a difficult film to watch, but it offers unparalleled insight into the minds of men for whom evil was the norm. The film was co-produced by teams in Denmark, Norway, and the UK.

Am©lie (2001)

Amelie

This French romantic comedy was nominated for five Oscars. The title character is raised a recluse but goes out in the world to work as a waitress following her mother's death. The result is a funny and charming story that eventually leads to love.

City of God (2002)

City of God

Set in the slums of Rio de Janiero, City of God follows a young kid as he rises through criminal ranks to become the city's drug kingpin. The film offers an incredible mix of action and drama. Its unflinching look at the Brazilian streets makes it an eye-opener, too. Many of the actors in City of God were themselves raised in Rio's slums.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009)

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

This Swedish film is the original adaptation of Stieg Larsson's international bestseller The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. If you love this film, check out the two sequels (The Girl Who Played With Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest) – they're on Netflix, too.

Infernal Affairs (2002)

Infernal AffairsInfernal Affairs

is a fast-paced action movie about betrayal on the streets of Hong Kong. The story centers around two men who aren't who they seem: one an undercover officer, the other a mole in the police department. American Martin Scorcese remade the movie in 2006, re-setting the story in Boston and calling it The Departed.

Ju-on: The Grudge (2002)

Ju-on: The Grudge

This excellent Japanese horror film got an American remake in 2004 starring Sarah Michelle Gellar. The Japanese version, however, remains far superior. Ju-on: The Grudge uses the familiar horror concept of a cursed house to very chilling effect.

Let the Right One In (2008)

Let the Right One In

Like several other films on this list, you may know 2008's Let the Right One In from its American remake (2010's Let Me In). Both movies are excellent. The original film is Swedish, like the novel that inspired the films. The story mixes horror and romance elements in a smart and meaningful way.

A Trip to the Moon (1902)

A Trip to the Moon

If you're in the mood to take in a piece of cinematic history, this one is for you. A Trip to the Moon was made all the way back in 1902, so it's a silent film, but it will have no problem holding your attention. At just over 14 minutes long, it's unusually short but completely unforgettable.

Way of the Dragon

Way of the Dragon

There are a lot of cool kung-fu movies on Netflix, but Way of the Dragon may be our favorite of them. Way of the Dragon doesn't take itself too seriously: it's an action-comedy. But the film stars both Bruce Lee and Chuck Norris, so you can rest assured that there will be plenty of action to go with the laughs.

Y Tu Mamá También (2001)

Y Tu Mamá También

Alfonso Cuar³n is now known for films like Gravity, but it's well worth going back and viewing his 2001 effort, Y Tu Mamá También. The film is a road movie and a coming-of-age story, but it's also about the country of Mexico and its political and economic struggles. Set in 1999, it's a must-see film for anyone who wants to understand what Mexico was like at that time.